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ASTHDAYR
Days missed due to asthma, past 12 months

Codes

ASTHDAYR is a 3-digit numeric variable, ranging from 0-366. In 2018, sample adult responses are top-coded at 180 and sample child responses are top-coded at 10. All other years are not top-coded.
Special codes are as follows:

010: 10 or more days (2018 sample children only)
180: 180 or more days (2018 sample adults only)
995: Homeschooled (sample children only)
996: Unable to work/didn't go to school
997: Unknown - Refused
998: Unknown - Not ascertained
999: Unknown - Don't know

Description

ASTHDAYR reports the number of days of work or (for children) of school/preschool/daycare that were missed due to asthma in the past 12 months. For all years except 2010, this information is available for sample adults and sample children who had an asthma episode/attack in the past 12 months (ASTHATAKYR). For 2010, the question was limited to sample adults employed in the past year. Please see Comparability tab for details on changes in the universe.

 

If necessary, interviewers read the following explanation to respondents, "For homemakers, this includes work around the house." No specific number of days were recorded if the person was homeschooled (IPUMS NHIS code 995), or if the person was unable to work or didn't go to school or daycare (IPUMS NHIS code 996).

Related variables for 2010 only: 

ASTHDAYR is also available for sample adults who were currently employed (EMPSTAT) or had been employed at some time in the past year (EMPSTATWKYR). Further, these sample adults noted when they had asthma in their life: they still have asthma (ASTHMASTIL) and were either (1) diagnosed with asthma at age 16 years or older (or their age of diagnosis is unknown) and their asthma has gotten worse as an adult (ASTHCHADULT).

Comparability

ASTHDAYR is completely comparable with an exception of slightly different question wording and responses in 2002, 2003, and 2010.

For only the 2002 and 2003 samples, for responses greater than or equal to 100 days, interviewers were prompted to ask, "[Reported value] is an unusually large number. Did you miss [reported value] days of work due to asthma?" If the respondent confirmed that the reported value was correct, interviewers were instructed to proceed. If the answer was incorrect, interviewers were instructed to change the answer.

For 2010, the supplement was focused on occupational health and there was a change in universe (as noted in the variable description). There was also a slight change in question wording compared to earlier years. This is the only year that focused on occupational health specifically.

 

In 2010, only sample adults were asked, "During the past 12 months, how many full days did you miss from work because of your asthma?" This question differs from other years because this supplement was specifically focused on occupational health.

By contrast, in 2002, 2003, and 2008, sample adults were asked more broadly, "During the past 12 months, how many days were you unable to work because of your asthma?"

Prior to 2018, responses were not top-coded for either sample adults or sample children; however, in 2018, sample adult responses were top-coded at 180 or more days and sample child responses were top-coded at 10 or more days.

Universe

  • 2002-2003: Sample adults age 18+ and sample children under age 18 who had an asthma attack/episode in the past 12 months.
  • 2008: Sample adults age 18+ and sample children under age 18 who had an asthma attack/episode in the past 12 months.
  • 2010: Sample adults 18+ who are currently employed or employed at some time in the past 12 months, who still have asthma, and who were age 16+ when their asthma was diagnosed, or were under 16 when diagnosed and their asthma has gotten worse as an adult, or or their age at time of diagnosis is unknown.
  • 2013; 2018: Sample adults age 18+ and sample children under age 18 who still have asthma or who had an asthma attack/episode in the past 12 months.

Availability

  • 2002-2003, 2008, 2010, 2013, 2018

Weights